Archive for the ‘House’ Category

Maison DuJour: Tom Ford London

dinsdag, augustus 25th, 2009

Tom Ford Home in London

Fashion designer Tom Ford’s home in Chelsea, London.. A unique semi-detached house (circa 3,705 sq ft) which is set back from the road and securely positioned behind a high wall and double gates. The property has recently been modernised and decorated to the highest standard, in a modern contemporary style using the finest materials.

Tom Ford Home in London

A unique semi-detached house (circa 3,705 sq ft) which is set back from the road and securely positioned behind a high wall and double gates. The property has recently been modernised and decorated to the highest standard, in a modern contemporary style using the finest materials. Located in the popular and exclusive Boltons Conservation Area, the property is also ideally situated close to the shops, bars and restaurants of both the Fulham Road and Old Brompton Road. £8,500,000..

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Tom Ford Home in London

Source: Rdujour.com

Tom Ford vs. Karl Lagerfeld: Which Home Do You Like Better?

dinsdag, augustus 25th, 2009

Seems like there’s a lot of buzz surrounding the high fashion industry these days…after all, it is certainly not every day that the Bobbed One appears on Letterman. And now we hear that Tom Ford has put his London townhouse for sale a cool £8 million (about $13 million to us on this side of the pond). After perusing the photos of his chrome-plated pad, we began a friendly debate in the office about which home we preferred: Tom Ford…or the legend of Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld? Decisions, decisions…

Tom Ford vs. Karl Lagerfeld

To be honest, it’s not too much of a struggle for us: Karl Lagerfeld is such an oddity (and we mean that in the best, most fascinating way possible). Can you imagine having a conversation with him? No, we can’t either. (Well, yes we can, and we hope it would be something like this). But we do like how his library matches his persona: excessive, shiny, but with personality:

Karl Lagerfeld

Karl Lagerfeld

As for Tom Ford’s place, it’s certainly impressive. And it has chrome walls, which seems pretty swanky; but at the same time, it could give someone the feeling of being trapped in a commercial grade refrigerator or an air vent:

Tom Ford’s home

Tom Ford’s home

Tom Ford’s home

Tom Ford’s home

What say you?

Source: Apartmenttherapy.com, Images: Aylesford via Mashkulture.net, Maison-Objet, PrestigeHK

Tom Ford’s house in Paris

maandag, juni 29th, 2009

 Tom Ford’s house in Paris

Michael called this at 10:58 p.m. yesterday, “This is Tom Ford’s apartment!”

Tom Ford’s house in Paris

Indeed. In Paris. Published in House and Garden January, 1998 and featured in HG’s Book of Style, the photos are by Todd Eberle.

Tom Ford’s house in Paris

The images from this morning are from the book; these are additional shots from the magazine.

Tom Ford’s house in Paris

After looking at 120 apartments before they settled on this one, chosen for its fifteen foot ceilings and view of the Seine, they decided to keep “the pastry.”

Tom Ford’s house in Paris

Clean but sensual, the home has a clear masculine aesthetic with the lucky distinction of having Gucci leather left-overs as upholstery.

Source: Mrsblandings.blogspot.com

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse on the Market

maandag, mei 18th, 2009

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse

Tom Ford’s London Townhouse

Tom Ford’s London townhouse is up for sale. He refurbished the place and had lived in the Gilston road residence for an undisclosed period. Even the garden has couture vibe. List price: £8,500,000.

Source: Luxus.mashkulture.net

Tom Ford Buys Rights to Minerals

dinsdag, oktober 30th, 2007

santa-fe.jpgSANTA FE— Fashion designer Tom Ford earlier this year acquired some of the mineral rights beneath his Galisteo ranch in an attempt to protect his land from possible oil exploration in the region.

In March, Ford paid about $84,000 through a brokerage firm to buy the lease to mineral rights to the more than 1,400 acres from the State Land Office, thereby preventing someone from one day drilling on his ranch south of Santa Fe, according to Land Office records and officials.

The purchase came in response to Tecton Energy’s controversial proposal to drill eight exploratory wells— and perhaps several more— on 65,000 acres in the Galisteo Basin southeast of Santa Fe where it has acquired the mineral rights.

Ford’s representatives had originally tried to persuade the Land Office not to sell oil and gas leases on property near his ranch, an agency official said Friday, though state trust lands are only a small slice of Tecton’s holdings.

But the Land Office was obligated to proceed with the bid sale because the agency is charged with raising revenue to benefit public education, John Bemis of the Land Office said Friday.

“It was tough for us to say, ‘We want you to enjoy your lifestyle out here, Mr. Ford’,” said John Bemis, an assistant commissioner for oil, gas and minerals.

Like Ford, scores of residents living in and around the Galisteo Basin face the hard reality that owning their land doesn’t mean they also own what lies beneath.

There’s little a surface owner can do to stop a mineral owner who wants to drill. “Both people have legitimate property rights,” Bemis said.

Split estates are a remnant of 19th-century homesteader laws in which the government gave settlers surface rights while keeping mineral rights for itself.

Most landowners probably had no idea when they bought their properties that the region was potentially rich in oil and gas, Bemis said.

There was a time when oil wells dotted the area and produced a relative trickle of petroleum. But that was two decades ago.

Now, Tecton believes advances in drilling technology will help it reach previously hard to extract resources: between 50 and 100 million barrels of light sweet crude oil and five to 10 trillion cubic feet of natural gas.

Residents of Madrid, Cerrillos and Galisteo strongly oppose the plan, which awaits consideration by the Santa Fe County Commission and state regulators. Residents will have the opportunity to weigh in on Thursday during the second of two meetings held by Tecton to gather public input.

Tecton officials have said they are committed to working with the community to ensure that energy development is as environmentally sensitive and unobtrusive as possible.

Even if landowners like Ford own both the mineral and the surface rights, they may still not be protected from energy development, Bemis said.

The reason is that a mineral owner who has no desire to get into the oil business can still be “force pooled”— a process by which one owner’s minerals are pooled with those of a nearby owner who wants to drill.

Source: Welcomehomeabq.blogspot.com By Raam Wong, Journal Northern Burea, pix of Santafereview.com

Tom Ford Aims to Block NM Oil Drilling

maandag, oktober 29th, 2007

New house of Tom FordSANTA FE — Fashion designer Tom Ford has bought mineral rights beneath his Galisteo ranch southeast of Santa Fe in an attempt to protect his land from possible oil exploration in the region.

Ford paid the state Land Office about $84,000 earlier this year to purchase the mineral rights to more than 1,400 acres, according to Land Office records.

“We are protecting our land by holding these rights,” said Ford’s attorney, Janet McKay. She declined further comment.

The purchase came in response to Tecton Energy’s controversial proposal to drill eight exploratory wells on 65,000 acres, or 101 square miles, in the Galisteo Basin where it has acquired mineral rights.

Ford’s representatives initially tried to persuade the Land Office not to sell oil and gas leases on property near his ranch, although state trust lands are only a small slice of Tecton’s holdings, said John Bemis of the Land Office.

The office was obligated to proceed with the bid sale because the agency is charged with raising revenue from the use of state trust lands to benefit public education, said Bemis, an assistant commissioner for oil, gas and minerals.

“It was tough for us to say, ‘We want you to enjoy your lifestyle out here, Mr. Ford,'” Bemis said.

Ford’s spread includes a working cattle ranch and an Old West movie set that has been used for several films, including the recent “3:10 to Yuma.”

Ford grew up in Santa Fe before moving on to become one of the world’s most influential fashion designers, with Yves Saint-Laurent, Gucci and then his own Tom Ford line.

Written by: The Associated Press Source: Miamiherald.com

Tom Ford loves a Barnaby Furnas

donderdag, augustus 16th, 2007

Tom Ford loves a Barnaby Furnas……..

“This painting I love. It’s a young artist, a contemporary artist, whose name is Barnaby Furnas,” he recently said. “I had seen some of his work in New York, and I thought it was great, so he came into London and he stood right there on the landing, looked at this wall, and we commissioned this for here, this piece.”

“It was just delivered a couple of months ago, but it just transformed this space because that big, bold splash of red works against the classicism of the rest of the house,” he said.

……..

Source: Sfluxe.com

Tom Ford and Ron Radziner

dinsdag, juli 17th, 2007

 Tom Ford and Ron Radziner

Interview with Tom Ford and Ron Radziner.

In this month’s issue of Wallpaper*, our favourite fashion icons choose an architect that inspires them or their work. To accompany this portfolio, over the next 10 days Wallpaper.com will feature 10 exclusive interviews with the designers and their architects of choice.

Wallpaper*: How can architecture help sell fashion?

Tom Ford: I think of my stores as being stage sets, so it is important that the architecture doesn’t overshadow the fashion. So the feel of the space is more important than the actual lines. In a store you should only notice the volume of the space. Although, personally, I like to live with challenging architecture, the same approach isn’t necessarily right for my stores. To be honest, great architects aren’t necessarily great decorators.

W*: Do you have a favourite building?

TF: My absolute favourite architect is Mies van der Rohe. Although I have never been there, I love the Tugendhat House in Brno in the Czech Republic and I have pored over pictures of it so many times. And, of course, I love the Farnsworth House, too.

W*: What sort of architecture do you think reflects your aesthetic?

TF: Again, Mies van der Rohe. With Mies, God was in the detail. I find the idea of chromed I-beams in the Tugendhat House so simple but so luxe. Refined minimalism – this is what excites me as a designer.

W*: What were your reasons for selecting Ron Radziner?

TF: I first got in contact with Ron after having visited the Kaufmann House in Palm Springs. I was so impressed by the refurbishment that I called him up and subsequently met up with him in LA to discuss working on my Richard Neutra house together. We worked on the theme of refined minimalism. Obviously the standards of construction in the 1950s were not exactly great, so we bumped up the quality of the materials used and the finishes. So, for example, where Neutra had specified pale blond wood in the original drawings, we replicated it in walnut.

W*: Have you done any other projects together?

TF: We are now working on our fourth house – though we have never worked on a store together. We make a good team. I always think the best results come from a strong architect working with a strong client. And I am a strong client!

W*: What is your favorite city and why?

TF: I have so many favourites, but I have to say I think the residential architecture in Los Angeles is wonderful. There is nowhere else quite like it, with the work of architects as diverse as Greene & Greene, Rudolf Schindler and Frank Gehry. People had the money and they built their fantasies. Another city I adore is Santa Fe, New Mexico, where I am in the process of building a house. The city has this amazing architectural unity thanks to its pueblo adobe style of construction.

W*: How difficult is it to combine your vision with that of someone whose vision may be equally strong?

Ron Radziner: In theory, it could be difficult if you worked with someone with a particularly different view of design, but Tom and I work well together because we see space in a similar way. It’s wonderful when you’re working with someone with a very strong visual sense. They can easily and quickly understand the design concept, so we can have an open, honest conversation about various aspects of the design. If someone doesn’t have that visual sensibility, you end up spending a lot of time explaining.

W*: Has this house build been a memorable event?

RR: We have worked on five residences for Tom, and each has been memorable. It has been wonderful to work with a client that shares a deep interest in the total design. We’ve been able to develop a strong architectural vision and see it through, down to the last detail of a door knob. There’s a huge challenge in taking a design vision down to that level of detail, but in the end it has a tremendous effect on the experience of the space.

Source: Wallpaper.com

Council OKs Tom Ford’s hilltop mansion

donderdag, juni 29th, 2006

34795_210x1000.jpg

After getting a go-ahead from the Santa Fe City Council early Tuesday for his proposed estate atop Talaya Hill, fashion designer Tom Ford said he is eager to begin construction.

The guru of Gucci said he has been spending most of his Santa Fe nights in hotels, “which I don’t like.”

Councilors voted 8-0 to reject a neighborhood-association attempt to overturn the project’s approval by the city Historic Design Review Board.

“Obviously, I’m very happy I can start building my home in Santa Fe,” Ford said following the council vote, which came a few minutes before 1 a.m. Tuesday. A power outage earlier in the evening delayed a Monday council meeting, leading to the late hour for the vote.

Ford could not give a date for when he expects the home to completed but said he wants work to begin as soon as possible.

The home will be among Santa Fe’s largest when completed, consisting of 15,862 square-feet of development on 10 acres. Plans include an 8,358 square-foot main house, 1,498 square-foot guest house, 1,586 square-foot garage, 3,628 square-feet of portales and a 792 square-foot pergola.

The design uses elements of the so-called old Santa Fe style, with long walls, rounded corners and details such as canales. The building’s exterior will be a medium-brown color, city records show. Heights vary between 11 and 20 feet.

It’s size had become a point of contention for some residents of surrounding neighborhoods.

“I guarantee there is not a home in our neighborhood with a 200-foot silhouette — two-thirds of a football field long,” said Peter Schoenfeld, president of the San Acacio Neighborhood Association. Schoenfeld had led the opposition to the project as it has proceeded through city committees.

Schoenfeld, who appealed the Historic Design Review Board’s February approval of the design, said the home’s massive scale was not in harmony with the surrounding neighborhoods. Ordinances that govern new construction in that part of east-side Santa Fe encourage designs to be harmonious with surrounding buildings, including color, material and size.

City staff argued that since the home site was on a hill above the neighborhood and there were no other residences within a 300-foot radius of the proposed home site, the Ford project was not a part of the neighborhood streetscape and was a unique project.

The council voted unanimously to reject the appeal filed by the neighborhood association but not without some criticism.

District 4 City Councilor Matthew Ortiz said he disagreed with the finding that the Ford site was not part of the local streetscape but felt arguments presented by the appellant did not warrant overturning the review board’s approval.

District 2 Councilor Karen Heldmeyer took issue with a statement by Ford’s representatives that they planned to plant enough trees around the home to screen it from view. She called the assertion “disingenuous.”

Source: By HENRY M. LOPEZ | The New Mexican

Tom Ford’s Adobe-Abode Dust-up

maandag, januari 9th, 2006

Designer’s Santa Fe neighbors decry “Wal-Mart on the hill.”

Will Tom Ford be able to build his rugged adobe pleasure dome on a hilltop in his hometown of Santa Fe, New Mexico? He’ll find out next month, when the city decides whether it’ll allow him to erect the 16,647-square-foot complex, which includes a 9,000-square-foot house, a 1,600-square-foot garage and guest apartment, and 4,000 square feet of covered portals, with walls made of genuine mud-based adobe. “Our goal is to make the house seem of the hill and not on the hill,” Ford told the Albuquerque Journal last month, after dropping a garage bay and shrinking the project a bit to appease the neighbors. The plot is on the meticulously Old West–rustic east side of town, where the roads are dirt and the residents include Ron Howard and Jane Fonda. Ford got ahold of the ten-acre plot after the city refused to let the previous owners build a somewhat smaller house than Ford proposes (the old owners sued Santa Fe and won $300,000). Ford shouldn’t think the locals will defer to his superior sense of design: One citizen described his planned home as “a Wal-Mart perched on a hill.”